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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 23

Release of phthalate esters in pasteurized milk samples with plastic packaging


1 Student Research Committee, School of Health; Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Health, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2 Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Health, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences; Environment Research Center, Research Institute for Primordial Prevention of Non-communicable disease, University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
3 Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Health, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Hamidreza Pourzamani
Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Environmental Research Center, School of Health, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijehe.ijehe_39_20

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Aim: In this study, the presence of four phthalate esters, including diethyl phthalate (DEP), Dibutyl phthalate, benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), and diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) in pasteurized milk with plastic packages was investigated during the time allowed for consumption. Materials and Methods: The pasteurized milk samples, including 7 high-consumed brands, were purchased from reputable stores and two factories in Isfahan in 2019. The concentration of phthalate esters was measured by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy paired with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. Results: According to the results of this study, among the analyzed samples of stores, DEHP (0.25 μg/l) and BBP (0.25 μg/l) had the highest mean concentrations in pasteurized milk, respectively. The analyzed results of the factories showed a high BBP of 0.1 μg/l. Among the studied brands, the highest concentration of phthalate esters was 0.42 μg/l. The mean concentrations obtained in this study were lower than the international standards set. Conclusion: Due to the low average concentration of phthalate esters in pasteurized milk, consumption of these products has no serious risk for humans and the share of pasteurized milk in terms of the presence of phthalate esters is negligible.


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